What if an employee refuses to come to work for fear of infection?

What should be done if an employee tests positive for COVID-19?

If an employee is confirmed to have COVID-19, employers should inform fellow employees of their possible exposure to COVID-19 in the workplace but maintain confidentiality as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Those who have symptoms should self-isolate and follow CDC recommended steps. In most workplaces, those potentially exposed but with no symptoms should remain at home or in a comparable setting and practice social distancing for 14 days.

What should I do if I have been exposed to someone with COVID-19?

Anyone who has had close contact with someone with COVID-19 should quarantine for 14 days after their last exposure to that person, except if they meet the following conditions: Someone who has been fully vaccinated and shows no symptoms of COVID-19 does not need to quarantine. However, fully vaccinated close contacts should: Wear a mask indoors in public for 14 days following exposure or until a negative test result. Get tested 5-7 days after close contact with someone with suspected or confirmed COVID-19. Get tested and isolate immediately if experiencing COVID-19 symptoms.

Are asthma patients at higher risk for developing severe illness from COVID-19?

People with moderate-to-severe or uncontrolled asthma are more likely to be hospitalized from COVID-19. Take steps to protect yourself.

What are the guidelines for construction employees during the COVID-19 pandemic?

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What does it mean to be unable to work, including telework for COVID-19 related reasons?

You are unable to work if your employer has work for you and one of the COVID-19 qualifying reasons set forth in the FFCRA prevents you from being able to perform that work, either under normal circumstances at your normal worksite or by means of telework. If you and your employer agree that you will work your normal number of hours, but outside of your normally scheduled hours (for instance early in the morning or late at night), then you are able to work and leave is not necessary unless a COVID-19 qualifying reason prevents you from working that schedule.

What are the COVID-19 risks in the manufacturing work environment?

The manufacturing work environment—production or assembly lines and other areas in busy plants where workers have close contact with coworkers and supervisors—may contribute substantially to workers’ potential exposures. The risk of occupational transmission of SARS-CoV-2 depends on several factors. Some of these factors are described in the U.S. Department of Labor and U.S. Department of and Health and Human Services’ booklet Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19.

Which group of children at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19?

Similar to adults, children with obesity, diabetes, asthma or chronic lung disease, sickle cell disease, or immunosuppression can also be at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Am I at risk for serious complications from COVID-19 if I smoke cigarettes?

Yes. Data shows that when compared to never smokers, cigarette smoking increases the risk of more severe illness from COVID-19, which could result in hospitalization, the need for intensive care, or even death.

Are obese people at a higher risk of severe COVID-19 illness?

Having obesity increases the risk of severe illness from COVID-19. People who are overweight may also be at increased risk. Having obesity may triple the risk of hospitalization due to a COVID-19 infection. Obesity is linked to impaired immune function.

Do I need to quarantine while waiting for my COVID-19 screening test result?

People without symptoms and without known exposure to COVID-19 do not need to quarantine while awaiting screening test results. If a person tests positive on a screening test and is referred for a confirmatory test, they should quarantine until they receive the results of their confirmatory test.

How long does it take for the COVID-19 to be infectious?

Get tested 3-5 days after their first exposure. A person with COVID-19 is considered infectious starting 2 days before they develop symptoms, or 2 days before the date of their positive test if they do not have symptoms.

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